ISSN 2398-2969      

Liver: hepatic lipidosis

Clapis

Introduction

  • Cause: anorexia, and cessation of gastrointestinal motility, resulting in a reduction in the absorption of fluids and nutrients from the foregut. This in turn leads to a reduction in fluids and nutrients to the cecal flora in the hindgut. Hepatic lipidosis often develops after a prolonged period of untreated gastrointestinal stasis.
  • Signs: total anorexia, lethargy, no fecal output. Often ataxic. Hypothermia.
  • Diagnosis: biochemistry, urinalysis, radiography (although no pathognomonic radiographic features of hepatic lipidosis), ultrasonography, liver biopsy, post-mortem examination.
  • Treatment: supportive treatment - fluid therapy, assisted feeding, analgesia.
  • Prognosis: poor. This is usually a terminal event.

Presenting signs

  • Anorexia.
  • Obese animals that become ill.
  • No fecal output.

Acute presentation

  • Depression.
  • Liver failure.
  • Convulsion.
  • Ataxia.
  • Death.

Sex predisposition

  • Pregnant and lactating rabbits that become anorexic.

Cost considerations

Special risks, eg anesthetic

  • Liver failure.

Pathogenesis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Prevention

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Outcomes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Ritzman T K (2014) Diagnosis and clinical management of gastrointestinal conditions in exotic companion mammals (rabbits, guinea pigs and chinchillas). Vet Clin Exot Anim 17 (2), 179-194 PubMed.
  • Meredith A & Raiment L (2000) Liver disease in rabbits. Semin Avian Exotic Pet Med (3), 146-152 ScienceDirect.

Other sources of information

  • Jepson L (2016) Rabbits. Exotic Animal Medicine, A Quick Reference Guide. 2nd edn. Ed: Jepson L. Elsevier, USA. pp 42-87.
  • Plumb D C (2015) Plumb’s Veterinary Drug Handbook. 8th edn. Wiley Blackwell Publishing, USA.
  • Harcourt-Brown F (2014) Digestive System Disease. In: BSAVA Manual of Rabbit Medicine. Eds: Meredith A & Lord B. BSAVA, UK. pp 168-190.
  • Meredith A & Vella D (2013) Hepatic Disorders. In: Clinical Veterinary Advisor. Birds and Exotic Pets. Eds: Mayer J & Donnelly T M. Elsevier, USA. pp 383-385.
  • Harcourt-Brown F (2013) Gastric Dilation and Intestinal Obstruction. In: BSAVA Manual of Rabbit Surgery, Dentistry and Imaging. Eds: Harcourt Brown F & Chitty J. BSAVA, UK. pp 172-189.
  • Harcourt-Brown F (2002) Digestive Disorders. In: Textbook of Rabbit Medicine. Butterworth & Heinemann. pp 249-291.
  • Jenkins J (2000) Rabbit and Ferret Liver and Gastrointestinal Testing. In: Laboratory Medicine: Avian and Exotic Pets. Ed: Fudge A. W B Saunders. pp 291-304.

Can’t find what you’re looking for?

We have an ever growing content library on Vetlexicon so if you ever find we haven't covered something that you need please fill in the form below and let us know!

 
 
 
 

To show you are not a Bot please can you enter the number showing adjacent to this field

 Security code