ISSN 2398-2950      

Clostridia spp

ffelis
Contributor(s):

Richard Walker

Synonym(s): Clostridia


Introduction

Classification

Taxonomy

  • Genus: Clostridium.
  • Family: Clostridiaceae.

Etymology

  • Gk: Clostridium: closter - a spindle.

Active Forms

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Clinical Effects

Epidemiology

Habitat

  • Most species are found in the environment and the gastrointestinal tract of animals.

Lifecycle

  • Reproduce using endospores.
  • Spores germinate in anaerobic environments.
  • Strictness of the anaerobic requirement varies with species.

Transmission

  • May be exogenous or endogenous.

Pathological effects

  • Immunity usually depends on the production of antitoxins.
  • Infection may be endogenous from the host's gut or exogenous from the environment.
  • Pathogenic species can be divided into 4 groups:
    • a) Neurotropic - produce potent neurotoxins, eg Clostridium botulinum.
    • b) Histotoxic - produce less potent toxins and are invasive, eg Clostridium perfringens type A.
    • c) Enterotoxic - toxins are absorbed from the gut, eg Clostridium perfringens types A-E.
    • d) Produce enteric disease. In some host species this is a consequence of antibiotic use, eg Clostridium difficile.

Other Host Effects

  • Many Clostridium spp are commensals, especially in the GI tract.

Control

Control via animal

Diagnosis

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Jang S S, Breher J E, Dabaco L A et al (1997) Organisms isolated from dogs and cats with anaerobic infections and susceptibility to selected antimicrobial agents. JAVMA 210 (11), 1610-1614 PubMed.
  • McDonough P L & Simpson K W (1996) Diagnosing emerging bacterial infections: salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis, clostridial toxicosis, and helicobacteriosis. Semin Vet Med Surg (Small Anim)​ 11 (3), 187-197 PubMed.

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