ISSN 2398-2985      

Neurological examination

6guinea pig

Introduction

  • The primary aims of a neurologic examination are to confirm whether or not a neurologic abnormality exists and to determine the location of the lesion(s) within the nervous system.
  • Having a standard order in which the examination is performed helps reduce omissions of tests and observations.
  • The rationale for the sequence of the examination is:
    • It starts at the head and proceeds caudally to the tail.
    • It is used for patients of all sizes and whether the patient is ambulatory or recumbent.
    • It considers the anatomic location of lesions as the examination proceeds.
    • Even if parts of the examination must be omitted because of the nature of the patient, suspicion of fracture, or financial constraints, the sequence ought to be followed.
  • Frequently, the presence of a neurologic lesion(s) cannot be deduced until the end of a thorough neurologic, and sometimes orthopedic, examination. 
  • After localization of the problem, and consideration of the signalment and historical disease course, a realistic differential diagnosis list can be formulated.
  • Diagnostic tests are next chosen to ascertain the ultimate diagnosis.
  • An accurate diagnosis provides information important for formulation of a treatment plan and realistic prognosis for the owner.

Equipment required

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to start a free trial to access all Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds and videos, or Login

Approach

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to start a free trial to access all Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds and videos, or Login

Involuntary movements

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to start a free trial to access all Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds and videos, or Login

Postural reactions

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to start a free trial to access all Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds and videos, or Login

Cranial nerve examination

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to start a free trial to access all Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds and videos, or Login

Spinal reflexes

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to start a free trial to access all Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds and videos, or Login

Ancillary diagnostic aids

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to start a free trial to access all Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds and videos, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed Papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Mancinelli E (2015) Neurologic examination and diagnostic testing in rabbits, ferrets, and rodents. J Exotic Pet Med 24 (1), 52-64 SciDirect.

Other sources of information

  • Antinoff N & Giovanella C J (2012) Ferrets: Musculoskeletal and Neurologic Diseases. In: Ferrets, Rabbits and Rodents: Clinical Medicine and Surgery. 3rd edn. Eds: Quesenberry K E & Carpenter J W. Elsevier, USA. pp 132-140. 
  • Lewis W (2009) Ferrets: Nervous and Musculoskeletal Disorders. In: BSAVA Manual of Rodents and Ferrets. Eds: Keeble E & Meredith A. BSAVA, UK. pp 303-310.

Can’t find what you’re looking for?

We have an ever growing content library on Vetlexicon so if you ever find we haven't covered something that you need please fill in the form below and let us know!

 
 
 
 

To show you are not a Bot please can you enter the number showing adjacent to this field

 Security code