ISSN 2398-2977      

Tongue trauma: repair

pequis

Introduction

  • Lacerations of the tongue may occur as a result of ingestion of foreign materials in feed, bit injuries, self-inflicted injuries on wire or nails, and injuries occurring during anesthetic recovery.
  • Severity and type of injury varies.
  • Many superficial injuries will heal by second intention Wound: healing - second intention.
  • Large deep lacerations should be sutured - if the rostral segment is viable - minimizes functional and cosmetic impairment.

Uses

  • Repair of deep severe tongue lacerations where rostral segment is viable Tongue: laceration.

Advantages

  • Superior functional and cosmetic result.
  • Rapid healing.

Disadvantages

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Prognosis

  • Good - if surgery takes place rapidly once injury is diagnosed and careful attention to surgical principles are shown → uncomplicated healing → minimal scarring.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Mata F, Johnson C & Bishop C (2015) A cross-sectional epidemiological study of prevalence and severity of bit-induced oral trauma in polo ponies and race horses. J Appl Anim Welf Sci 18 (3), 259-268 PubMed.
  • Lang H M, Panizzi L, Smyth T T et al (2014) Management and long-term outcome of partial glossectomy in 2 horses. Can Vet J 55 (3), 263-267 PubMed.
  • Hague B A & Honnas C M (1998) Traumatic dental disease and soft tissue injuries of the oral cavity. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 14 (2), 333-347 PubMed.
  • Modransky P, Welker B & Pickett J P (1989) Management of facial injuries. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract (3), 665-682 PubMed.

Organisation(s)

  • Dixon P D & Gerard M P (2019) Oral Cavity and Salivary Glands. In: Equine Surgery. 5th edn. Eds: Auer J & Stick J. Saunders, USA. pp 440-474.

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