ISSN 2398-2942      

Closed castration

icanis

Synonym(s): Orchiectomy


Introduction

  • Surgical removal of the testes through a prescrotal incision without invading the vaginal tunics.

Uses

  • Eliminate male fertility and inhibit associated behavioral responses.
  • Treatment of certain diseases influenced by male sex hormones, eg prostatic diseases Prostate disease , perianal adenomas Adenoma / adenocarcinoma and perineal hernias Perineum: rupture.
  • Treatment of testicular Testicle: neoplasia , epididymal or scrotal neoplasia.
  • Treatment of medically unresponsive orchitis Orchitis / epididymitis.
  • To prevent perpetuation of congenital problems, eg abdominally retained testicles Testicle: cryptorchidism and umbilical hernias.

  • In cryptorchid animals an inguinal and/or abdominal incision is likely to be required.
  • Severe scrotal and/or testicular trauma.
  • As part of scrotal urethrostomy procedure Urethrostomy.
  • As part of treatment of certain endocrine conditions and, occasionally, as part of treatment to control idiopathic epilepsy Epilepsy: idiopathic.

Advantages

  • In "closed" castration, vaginal tunics are not entered, so ligatures are placed directly around spermatic cord and contained structures, thereby reducing risk of bleeding from incised vaginal tunics.
  • Rapid, easy technique.
  • No opening created in peritoneal cavity, so infection in region of castration is not likely to spread into peritoneal cavity.
  • No possibility of seeding local wound with tumor cells because tunics and testicle remain intact.

Disadvantages

  • No tension must be placed on spermatic cord during clamping or ligation and extra care is required to place secure ligatures since vessels supplying testicles are indirectly ligated (ligatures are placed around tunics not directly on vessels).
  • More risk of catastrophic bleeding if ligatures are not secure.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Procedure

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Gourley J (1998) Early neutering of cats and dogs. Vet Rec142 (9), 228 PubMed.
  • Michell A R (1998) Neutering and longevity in dogs. Vet Rec 142 (11), 288 PubMed.
  • Poole C (1998) Early neutering of cats and dogs. Vet Rec 142 (9), 227-228 PubMed.
  • Thornton P D (1998) Early neutering of cats and dogs. Vet Rec 142 (8), 200 PubMed.

Other sources of information

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