ISSN 2398-2942      

Cranberry extract containing proanthocyanidins for urinary health

icanis
Contributor(s):

Amy Howell

Synonym(s): Dietary supplements


Historical use of cranberries for urinary health

  • Women have long been recommended to take cranberry products as a preventative for recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs).
  • The mechanism of action was long considered to be the acidification of urine; this has since been disproven.
  • The benefits of cranberry are now known to be related to their bioactive component proanthocyanidin (PAC) Cranberry proanthocyanidins (PACs) , which helps prevent uropathogenic Esherichia coli (E.coli Escherichia coli ) bacteria from adhering to bladder cells.

Urinary tract infections in dogs

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Properties of proanthocyanidins

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Summary

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Tufenkji N, Rifai O J, Harmidy K et al (2010) Cranberry derived proanthocyanidins can prevent pathogen invasion of kidney epithelial cells. Food Research International 43 (3), 922-924 VetMedResource.
  • Li M, Andrew M A, Wang J et al (2009) Effects of cranberry juice on pharmacokinetics of beta-lactam antibiotics following oral administration. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 53 (7), 2725-2732 PubMed.
  • Eydelnant I A & Tufenkji N (2008) Cranberry derived proanthocyanidins reduce bacterial adhesion to selected biomaterials. Langmuir 24 (18), 10273-10281 PubMed.
  • Bubenik L J, Hosgood G L, Waldron D R et al (2007) Frequency of urinary tract infection in catheterized dogs and comparison of bacterial culture and susceptibility testing results for catheterized and noncatheterized dogs with urinary tract infections. J Am Vet Med Assoc 231 (6), 893-899 PubMed.
  • Howell A B (2007) Bioactive compounds in cranberries and their role in prevention of urinary tract infections. Mol Nutr Food Res 51 (6), 732-737 PubMed.
  • Ogeer-Gyles J, Mathews K, Weese J S et al (2006) Evaluation of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from the urine of dogs with indwelling urinary catheters. J Am Vet Med Assoc 229 (10), 1584-1590 PubMed.
  • Howell A B, Reed J D, Krueger C G et al (2005) A-type cranberry proanthocyanidins and uropathogenic bacterial anti-adhesion activity. Phytochemistry 66 (18), 2281-2291 PubMed.
  • Foo L Y, Lu Y, Howell A B et al (2000) A-type proanthocyanidin trimers from cranberry that inhibit adherence of uropathogenic P-fimbriated Escherichia coli. J Nat Prod 63 (9), 1225-1228 PubMed.
  • Avorn J, Monane M, Gurwitz J H et al (1994) Reduction of bacteriuria and pyuria after ingestion of cranberry juice. JAMA 271 (10), 751-754 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Howell A & Bartges J (2010) Clinical notes: Benefits of cranberry extracts for management of UTI. NAVC Clinician's Brief  May, 49-50.
  • Howell A B (2010) Inhibition of P-fimbriated Escherischia coli adhesion in an innovative ex-vivo model in dogs receiving a bioactive cranberry tablet (Crananidin"). J Vet Intern Med 24 (3), 678.

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