ISSN 2398-2969      

Skin: acute moist dermatitis

icanis

Synonym(s): Hotspot, Wet eczema


Introduction

  • Cause: primary anal sacculitis, otitis externa, fleabite hypersensitivity, scabies, food allergy, atopy , poor coat hygiene.
  • Signs: lesion = acute onset single or mulifocal area of moist erythema, alopecia, pruritus, apparent pain and exudation.
  • Diagnosis: history, histopathology.
  • Treatment: clip and clean +/- antibiotics + identification of underlying cause of pruritus.
  • Prognosis: responds promptly to appropriate therapy, may recur.
    Print off the owner factsheet Hot spots (wet eczema, pyotraumatic dermatitis) Hot spots (wet eczema, pyotraumatic dermatitis) to give to your client.

Pathogenesis

Etiology


Primary Causes

Predisposing factors

General
  • Ear disease.
  • Hypersensitivity disorders.

Specific

Pathophysiology

  • Unclear, but the following is suggested:
    • Changes to skin surface micro-environment → increased bacterial populations.
    • Primary trigger → pruritus → self-trauma → inoculation of skin with bacteria → worsened pruritus → vicious cycle.

Diagnosis

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Treatment

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Prevention

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Littlewood J D, Lakhani K H, Paterson S, Wood J L N & Chanter N (1999) Clindamycin hydrochloride and clavulanate-amoxycillin in the treatment of canine superficial pyoderma. Vet Rec 144 (24), 662-665 PubMed.
  • Hill P B & Moriell K A (1994) Canine pyoderma. JAVMA 204 (3), 334-340 PubMed.

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