ISSN 2398-2969      

Chasing (livestock, cats, vehicles, joggers, children)

icanis
Contributor(s):

Introduction

  • Common problem with significant legal implications.
  • Behavior often self-rewarding → requires high level of commitment from owner to resolve.
  • The longer the behavior has been going on, the harder it is to resolve.

Pathogenesis

Etiology

  • Inherited predisposition to chase.
  • Reinforcement of behavior.
  • Learned response.

Predisposing factors

General
  • Excited reaction from handler to behavior.
  • Failure to control response during early/first exposure to target stimulus.
  • Follows an episode of teasing or excitement by a particular target object, leading to a response, then generalization.

Pathophysiology

  • May be an extension of herding behavior ( may be normal), or territorial behavior/patrol Aggression: territorial.
  • May be associated with certain abnormal pathological behaviors, protection/territorial aggression, predatory aggression.
  • Behavior is reinforced as target object withdraws - the goal has been achieved.
  • Increased arousal from behavior performance is also reinforcing.
  • Extension of play behavior.
  • Moving object → excitement and motivation to chase → target moves away → positive feedback on motivation to chase and lowered threshold for chasing.
  • Generalized decrease in self-control or well-controlled but increases reactivity.
  • Owner control decreased if owner makes unsuccessful attempts to restrain animal, eg through ineffective verbal commands → dog learns that commands are not significant.
  • Owner punishes dog on return → punishment appears to be for return not act → dog less likely to return.
  • Response may initially be specific and then generalizes from this focus.

Timecourse

  • Variable.
  • May become established after a single exposure or result from many encounters.

Diagnosis

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Treatment

This article is available in full to registered subscribers

Sign up now to obtain ten tokens to view any ten Vetlexicon articles, images, sounds or videos, or Login

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

Other sources of information

  • Landsberg G, Hunthausen W & Ackerman L (1997)Handbook of Behavior Problems of the Dog and Cat.pp 141-142.
  • Overall K L (1997)Clinical Behavioral Medicine for Small Animals.pp 269.
  • Askew H (1996)Treatment of Behaviour Problems in Dogs and Cats.pp 178-179.
  • Beaver B (1982)Why Dogs Chase Cars.VM/SACpp 1178.

Organisation(s)

  • Association of Pet Behaviour Counsellors, PO Box 46, Worcester WR8 9YS, UK. Tel/Fax: +44 (0)1386 751151; Email: apbc:petbcent.demon.co.uk; Website: http://www.apbc.co.uk.

Want more related items, why not
contact us

Can’t find what you’re looking for?

We have an ever growing content library on Vetlexicon so if you ever find we haven't covered something that you need please fill in the form below and let us know!

 
 
 
 

To show you are not a Bot please can you enter the number showing adjacent to this field

 Security code