Hip: capsulorrhaphy in Cats (Felis) | Vetlexicon
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Hip: capsulorrhaphy

ISSN 2398-2950

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Introduction

  • To re-inforce repair of torn hip joint capsule, thereby increasing stability of reduction of luxation.

Uses

Disadvantages

  • Sutures may break resulting in acute lameness or reluxation.

Alternative techniques

Decision taking

Criteria for choosing test

  • Joint capsule too torn for simple repair - will not provide sufficient support for open reduction.

Requirements

Materials required

Minimum equipment

  • Standard surgical kit.
  • Drill.

Minimum consumables

  • 2 bone screws (2.0-2.4 mm) and washers or preferably suture screws.
  • Large gauge PDS, prolene or nylon.

Preparation

Dietary preparation

  • Fast patient for 12 hours prior to general anesthesia to prevent reflux esophagitis.

Site preparation

Approach

Preparation

  • Standard aseptic (clip, wash, swab and drape).

Restraint

Technique

Approach

Step 2 - Dissection

  • Open reduction of hip. 

Step 3 - Hip reduction

  • Open reduction of hip.

Core procedure

Step 1 - Preparation for prosthesis

  • Place 2 screws at dorsal rim of acetabulum to act as pegs.
  • Drill tunnel in dorsal aspect of femoral neck or through greater trochanter.

Step 2 - Placing prosthesis

  • Pass suture material through tunnel and take under screw head and washer or through the hole in each suture screw in turn.

Exit

Step 1 - Closure

Aftercare

Outcomes

Complications

  • Suture breakage may occur, causing acute lameness between 4 and 10 weeks post-operatively.

Prognosis

  • Peri-articular structures heal sufficiently to stabilize joint after about 10 weeks - cases of suture breakage regain function about this time without further treatment.
  • If multiple limb injuries a transarticular pin may provide better stability to the reduced hip.

Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Rochereau P, Bernardé A (2012) Stabilization of coxo-femoral luxation using tenodesis of the deep gluteal muscle. Technique description and reluxation rate in 65 dogs and cats (1995-2008). Vet Comp Orthop Traumatol 25 (1), 49-53 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Montavon P M, Voss K, Langley-Hobbs S J (2009) Feline Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Disease. Elsevier/Saunders.