Wound: dressing in Horses (Equis) | Vetlexicon
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Wound: dressing

ISSN 2398-2977


Introduction

  • Dressing of open wounds.
  • Support or protection of body parts.
Print-off the Owner factsheet on Bandaging - the dos and don'ts to give to your client.

Uses

  • Decrease contamination.
  • Minimize edema.
  • Absorption of exudate/maintenance of a moist wound environment.
  • Immobilization.
  • Protection from further trauma.
  • Vehicle for topical antimicrobials.
  • Pain reduction.
  • Obliterate dead space.
  • Prevention of exuberant granulation tissue.
  • Wound debridement.
  • Control hemorrhage.
  • Maintenance of temperature.
  • Lowers pH at site.

Disadvantages

  • Skin necrosis particularly over accessory carpal bone and proximal calcaneus (point of the hock).
Place a ring of orthopedic felt or padding around the accessory carpal bone and a pad of cotton wool over the point of the hock to increase the area of contact.

Technical problems

  • Wicking of bacteria inwards to wound if exudate seeps to external layer.
  • Slippage.
  • Trauma on removal of adherent dressing.

Alternative techniques

Time required

Procedure

  • 5-10 min.

Decision taking

Criteria for choosing test

  • Open wound.
  • Significant edema, hemorrhage, exudate or dead space.
  • Some immobilization required.
  • Further trauma anticipated by location of wound.
  • Adherent dressing: loose necrotic tissue, foreign, exudate or fluid.
  • Non-adherent dressing: wounds in stages of repair, ?also beneficial in acute wounds.
  • Sticky or stretchy tertiary layer if bandage likely to slip.

Risk assessment

  • Patient compliance and tolerance; some horses will resist bandaging and try to kick it off.

Requirements

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Preparation

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Technique

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Aftercare

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Outcomes

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Further Reading

Publications

Refereed papers

  • Recent references from PubMed and VetMedResource.
  • Kamus L J, Theoret C & Costa M C (2018) Use of next generation sequencing to investigate the microbiota of experimentally induced wounds and the effect of bandaging in horses. PLoS One 13 (11), e0206989 PubMed.
  • Canada N C, Beard W L, Guyan M E & White B J (2018) Effect of bandaging techniques on sub-bandage pressures in the equine distal limb, carpus, and tarsus. Vet Surg 47 (5), 640-647 PubMed.
  • Eggleston R B (2018) Equine wound management: Bandages, casts, and external support. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 34 (3), 557-574 PubMed.
  • Maher M & Kuebelbeck L (2018) Nonhealing wounds of the equine limb. Vet Clin North Am Equine Pract 34 (3), 539-555 PubMed.
  • Canada N C, Beard W L, Guyan M E & White B J (2017) Measurement of distal limb sub-bandage pressure over 96 hours in horses. Equine Vet J 49 (3), 329-333 PubMed.
  • Lutter J D, Cary J A, Stephens R R & Potts L B (2015) Relative stiffness of 3 bandage/splint constructs for stabilization of equine midmetacarpal fractures. J Vet Emerg Crit Care 25 (3), 379-387 PubMed.
  • Milne S D & Connolly P (2014) The influence of different dressings on the pH of the wound environment. J Wound Care 23 (2), 53-57 PubMed.

Other sources of information

  • Bischofberger A S (2019) Drains, Bandages, and External Coaptation. In: Equine Surgery. 5th edn. Eds: Auer J & Stick J. Saunders, USA. pp 280-300.
  • Elce Y A (2017) Bandaging and Casting Techniques for Wound Management. In: Equine Wound Management. 3rd edn. Eds: Theoret C & Schumacher. Wiley Blackwell, USA. pp 132-156.